Category Archives: Uncategorized

Real Advertising Ideas

Need some creative candy for  a great marketing idea of just want to see what real advertisng looks like. Check out this years Cannes Lions 2010 Champions.


The Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival is the world’s only truly global meeting place for professionals in the communications industry. Don’t you wish you had gone. Well maybe this will help. Check out the winners at this website or if you want to check out the winners for Viral Communications check out the videos below.


YouTube and Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival have today announced that Andrew Dobbie (25) who works at JWT Manchester, United Kingdom, and Rachel Wolak (28) who works at Crispin Porter + Bogusky in Colorado, USA, have won the viral ad competition to promote WaterAid and will become ‘Team YouTube’, the 40th team to compete in this year’s Young Lions Film Competition in Cannes.


Andrew Dobbie’s winning entry




Rachel Wolak’s winning entry


Ads On The Internet Get Better And Better

Ok this is really great stuff. In fact the ads are so powerful that the sponsors website has crashed. The ads are still up and running on YouTube so I have embedded them in this post.

Give this one a view and enjoy the subtle messaging, brilliant.

Ads like these are usually produced for internet distribution and you will probably be seeing more and more of these mini stories in the future.

Here is part 2. It’s a bit slow but worth the wait.

By the way Seinfeld did a bunch for American Express commercials with Superman as a cartoon to feature some of American Expresses special services. Check pout these links: Superman ad 1 Superman ad 2 Superman ad 3

Will It Blend Is Still My Top Viral Video

I am constantly telling clients that viral videos is the way to go. However not all people understand that a viral video is not about there product but about the “entertainment” gained from watching there product in action. To this point I give you my top 5 choices that illustrate this fact.

Rules:

Has to use product

Has to be on  low budget

Has to be cool

That’s it.

I hope you enjoy the videos I still do.


#1: Will it Blend is probably one of the most successful concept for promoting a blender that can eat through anything… including an ipad.





#2: This advert that they created for the new Honda Accord became iconic. The sheer scope of what they accomplished ensured that people were forwarding this advert to each other across the entire Internet.



#3: All this video does is raise awareness of Guitar Hero, but done in such a cool way that it’s indistinguishable from normal user-generated content. Not bad for a marketing team.



#4: This is an awareness test. The video actually gets you to count because lets face it we all love a wearied challenge. Then it flips you out with the punchline.



#5: This is a bit more big budget but it illustrates the importance of entertainment very well. This campaign went on to create a bunch more videos on the same theme.


Are people addicted to your blog?

Originally posted by Tamar Weinberg

If you want more people to visit your blog on a regular bases then check out the 11 great insights from Tamar Weinberg at Techipedia. She has great info and I would highly recommend RSSing her blog.

1.    Consistency.  Readers want lots of posts, and “neglected content may inadvertently translate to neglecting your readers too.”

2.    Eloquence.  Read a lot, write well and proofread. Weinberg’s favorite bloggers “always have something insightful to say,” and “their content exudes intelligence and occasional wit.”

3.    Uniqueness.  Channeling Darren Rowse, Weinberg argues that being unique “requires not doing what everyone else does.”  I.e. don’t repeat the news with nothing new to offer.

4.    Specific.  Focus on a niche and master it.

5.    Personal.  Let readers get to know the person behind the screen. Write “personal stories as it relates to your mission in blogging,” Weinberg says.

6.    Analytical.  “People love data, and they love knowing how data can be aggregated to make conclusions. They love charts and graphics, and they love the findings that can be made from this data in aggregate,” Weinberg says.  So give it to them.

7.    Detail.  Details take a regurgitated news story and make them your own.  The more detail, the better.

8.    Thought-Provoking.  Leave your readers thinking about your post long after they click away.

9.    Passion.  If you are passionate about your blog, readers will notice.

10.    Instructional.  Teach your readers how to do something interesting and useful, and it will be impossible for them not to share.

11.    Networked.  Be active in your quest to attract readers. “In order for people to find you,” Weinberg says, “you need to be able to market your blog to them. How does one do this? Comment on other bloggers’ posts consistently. Send tweets out to the bloggers with your own commentary.”

Oh My God… 6 More Google Tricks Worth Discovering

These great tips are curtasy of of Darko Johnson’s  great blog post on a 6 cool things Google helps you do. Check out my quick cuts and if you like any visit the main blog with graphics and a more in-depth explanation.

  1. Create unlimited disposable email addresses with Gmail
    If you add dots (.) between the letters of your Gmail username, sending an message to the new username will get forwarded to your original email (which is without or with only 1 dot.)
  2. Find beautiful wallpapers in 10 seconds using Google Images
    Nowadays it’s VERY easy to find ANY type of wallpaper using Google images.  A neat trick to find alternatives to all types of products using Google Search
  3. Search any video site like a pro using Google Video
    Let’s just say you’re a big fun of MetaCafe.com. You want to learn German and use their internal search engine to find some videos this topic:
  4. Detect any unknown language using Google Language Detector
    Another good way to detect and also translate is to use Google Translate and the “Detect Language” option. This is very fast and accurate way to detect any language.
  5. See what the French have been searching for recently using Google Insights
    You can easily figure out what are the most popular search terms for any country (Google is the #1 search engines in most of the world’s countries) by using one neat tool called Google Insights.

Google Maps and the Vancouver Olympics

Where are the bars?

Check out this great map.

Olympic Reporter’s 2010 Winter Games
Vancouver Sun 2010 Olympics reporter Jeff Lee’s comprehensive listing of Olympic venues, hospitality events, pavilions, sponsor houses, road restrictions, Flag Walk & more for the 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics.

MAP ICON KEY
Snowflakes – Official celebration sites
Green tents: Official competition & practice venues
Red dot tags: Canadian official houses
Red tags: Other countries’ pavilions
Yellow tags: Sponsor sites & events
Yellow pins: Vancouver Sun offices & house
Pink dot tags: Media centres
Green dot tags: City Halls
Green tags: Special Olympic sites
Blue flags: Official IOC sites
Trains: transit & Amtrak
Ship: SeaBus, ferries, Norwegian Star, RCMP cruise ships
Airplane:YVR, Harbour, Helijet
Blue dot tags: Olympic bus network,
Purple dot tags:free bicycle valet

Google View on Whistler slopes!

Where are the Mars Bars…

Leave it to Google Maps to take it to the next level. Yep they have done a street view of Whistlers sky runs just in time for the Olympics. Check them out and see where you would like to sky next year when the slopes have less competition.The Google snowmobile is equipped with a full Street View camera system. In typical scrappy Google fashion, they were able to put it together over the course of a few weekends using extra pieces from Street View cars, some 2x4s, some duct tape, and a lot of extra hard drives (keeping them running properly in the freezing conditions was one of our major concerns).


They got in touch with the folks at Whistler Resort to discuss this slightly crazy idea… amazingly they were just as enthusiastic. In fact, they even suggested photographing the roads and paths of Whistler Village.

FaceBook Fan-page Analysis

But what about Canada?


With the emergence of several new sources of data this week the lowly analyst is bringing fascinating new insight into the world of Data Mining and social applications like FaceBook. Check out this cool little web-data page to get the lowdown on fan-pages.

Here is part of a fascinating article “The Man Who Looked Into Facebook’s Soul

If what people call Web 2.0 was all about creating new technologies that made it easy for everyday people to publish their thoughts, social connections and activities, then the next stage of innovation online may be services like recommendations, self and group awareness, and other features made possible by software developers building on top of the huge mass of data that Web 2.0 made public. It’s a very exciting future, and Warden is about to fire one of the earliest big shots in that direction.

If you think that’s interesting you will really enjoy these defining zones in good old USA.

In a nutshell, Warden’s data analysis showed that Facebook users in the U.S. can be roughly segmented into seven regions, which he named facetiously:

Stayathomia: This belt’s defining feature is how near most people are to their friends, implying they don’t move far.

Dixie: Like Stayathomia, Dixie towns tend to have links mostly to other nearby cities rather than spanning the country.

Greater Texas: Unlike Stayathomia, there’s a definite central city to this cluster, otherwise most towns just connect to their immediate neighbors.

Mormonia: The only region that’s completely surrounded by another cluster, Mormonia mostly consists of Utah towns that are highly connected to each other, with an offshoot in Eastern Idaho.

Nomadic West: The defining feature of this area is how likely even small towns are to be strongly connected to distant cities; it looks like the inhabitants have done a lot of moving around the county.

Socalistan: LA is definitely the center of gravity for this cluster. Almost everywhere in California and Nevada has links to both LA and SF, but LA is usually first.

Pacifica: Tightly connected to each other, it doesn’t look like Washingtonians are big travelers compared to the rest of the West, even though a lot of them claim to need a vacation.

G-mail Still the Best

If only it did the dishes too…


If you didn’t already know… Gmail is a free webmail and POP email service provided by Google, known for its abundant storage and advanced interface.

It is known as Google Mail in the United Kingdom and Germany and recently aggregrated Google Talk to its online service as well, providing users with an online chat feature for quickly communication from any computer in the world.

It currently offers 2GB+ of disk storage for emails and attachments and it’s fully integrated with Google Calendar. The account memory increases the longer you have the service.

Now, if you know all that, you might be interested in super charging your g-mail skills using Firefox (don’t get me started on how good this browser is) . Check out these 2 great locations. If that’s not enough then check out this blog post at lifehacker.com for lots of great posts.

TED Continues to Amaze All

But now I have to think more!



“There’s a flip side to everything,” the saying goes, and in 2 minutes, Derek Sivers shows this is true in a few ways you might not expect.

Why you should listen to him:
Derek Sivers (link to his blog) is best known as the founder of CD Baby. A professional musician since 1987, he started CD Baby by accident in 1998 when he was selling his own CD on his website, and friends asked if he could sell theirs, too.

CD Baby was the largest seller of independent music on the web, with over $100M in sales for over 150,000 musician clients.

In 2008, Sivers sold CD Baby to focus on his new ventures to benefit musicians, including his new company, MuckWork, where teams of efficient assistants help musicians do their “uncreative dirty work.”

“Derek Sivers is changing the way music is bought and sold. A musicians’ savior. One of the last music-business folk heroes.”

Esquire Magazine